Turn a 3D Scan into a Printable Model

In this part of our tutorial, you will learn how to repair a file from a 3D scanner. This part is composed of two sections:

The first section will be focused on repairing a very badly scanned file. The second section is more centered on a well scanned file that needs minor reparations.

You can retrieve the Stanford Bunny models that we use in this part on this page. 


This part of the tutorial is also available in video:

Summary​

  • 1.1. Create Parts that Match Material Minimal Thickness Guidelines
  • 1.2. Associate One Solid with One Component
  • 1.3. Avoid Creating Intersecting Objects
  • 1.4. Avoid Creating Non Manifold Components
  • 1.5. Avoid Creating Cantilevered Objects
  • 1.6. Shell Objects
  • 1.7. Add Text
  • 1.8. Create Interlocking parts (Only possible for plastic, resin and alumide materials)
  • 1.9. Combine Solids
  • 2.1. Convert a File toa STL and Check the Mesh
  • 2.2. Adjust the Mesh
  • 2.3. Check Mesh
  • 2.4. Export, Upload and Review
  • 2.5. Best Practices when Modeling for 3D Printing
  • 3.1. Check Mesh
  • 3.2. Separate Parts
  • 3.3. Repair Non Manifold Parts
  • 3.4. Repair Intersection Issues
  • 3.5. Spot and Fix Modeling Errors
  • 4.1. Thicken a Mesh
  • 4.2. Solve Intersection Issues
  • 4.3. Repair on Sculpteo.com
  • 4.4. Solve Intersection Issues
  • 4.5. Adjust Mesh
  • 4.6. Online Hollowing

Section 1: Badly Scanned Stanford Bunny

In this section, we will study a stanford bunny that comes from a 3D scanner and that has been badly modeled.

Thanks to the purple color of the mesh and the surface icon the structure tab, we immediately spot that this model is only a surface with zero volume which is not suitable for 3D printing.

SpaceClaim-49-Part1_intro.jpg

We can use the Thicken tool to directly thicken the mesh to the desired thickness

SpaceClaim-50-Thickening.jpg

We can use a cutaway view to make sure that the Thicken tool worked properly.

SpaceClaim-51-Thickening.jpg

By uploading your file to Sculpteo.com, you can use the very powerful online repairing tools to repair your object.

SpaceClaim-54-Repairing_Sculpteo.jpg

A first automatic repair leaves some holes in the mesh.

SpaceClaim-55-Repairing_Sculpteo.jpg

We can use other repairing methods to solve this issue. Here, the visible reconstruction method is very efficient and we obtain a printable model in the end.

SpaceClaim-56-Intersection_tool.jpg

Section2: Well Scanned Stanford Bunny

In this section, we will study a Stanford Bunny that comes from a 3D scanner but that has been well modeled. 

As usual, we check the Mesh. It is self intersecting.

SpaceClaim-57-Intersection_tool.jpg 

We use the Intersections tool in the Cleanup section to identify the intersecting areas.

SpaceClaim-58-Intersection_tool.jpg

We zoom in.

SpaceClaim-59-Intersection_tool_sTsgXId.jpg

Then, we hit the green check sign to make SpaceClaim solve these problems.

SpaceClaim-60-Intersection_tool.jpg

This time, the check mesh tool indicates that there is no remaining issue.

We can use the tools in the Adjust section to smooth, reduce or regularize the mesh.

As an example, here we reduce the number of triangles by 20% which will make a lighter file that will be faster to upload and easier to handle for the 3D Printer.

SpaceClaim-61-Intersection-tool.jpg

A cutaway view let us know that our design is full of useless material that we can safely remove.

SpaceClaim-62-Online_hollowing.jpg

The easiest way to do that is to upload your design to Sculpteo.com and use the hollowing tools that are optimised for 3D printing. The model is automatically hollowed with an appropriate thickness and you can add holes where you want.

SpaceClaim-63-Online_hollowing.jpg


Now you’re design is ready to be printed and you know how to model on SpaceClaim for 3D printing!